Read Our FAQ!
Learn More About Our Delivery!
Call Us on 07977990613

Injector Testing

Sort By

FUEL INJECTOR TESTING REPAIR AND RECONDITIONING SERVICE 

DIESEL FUEL INJECTOR TESTING SERVICE

WHAT WE DO?

 ☑  ELECTRONIC SOLENOID TEST

 ☑ PRESSURE NOZZLE LEAK TEST

 ☑  BACKLEAK / RETURN TEST 

 ☑  SPRAY PATTERN TEST 

 ☑ START OF INJECTION TEST 

 ☑ FUEL CONTAMINATION 

 ☑ TEST REPORT PROVIDED 

DIESEL FUEL INJECTOR REPAIR AND RECONDITIONING 

WHAT WE DO? 

☑ CHECK INJECTOR FOR DAMAGE AND CRACKS 

☑ DISASSEMBLE AND CHECK ALL THE INTERNAL INJECTOR PARTS 

☑ ULTRASONICALLY CLEAN ALL THE INJECTOR PARTS 

☑ REPLACE ALL THE DAMAGED PARTS WITH NEW PARTS 

☑ REASSEMBLE INJECTOR IN OUR DUST FREE WORKSHOP 

☑ FULLY TEST THE INJECTOR TO OEM SPECIFICATIONS 

☑ TWO YEAR GUARANTEE 

DIESEL FUEL INJECTOR CLEANING PROCESS

OUR DIESEL INJECTOR CLEANING PROCESS:

 

Sand Blast
  ☞ For outer body cleaning 

Ultrasonic Cleaner
  ☞ For internal parts cleaning 

High-Pressure Air 
  ☞ For small fuel holes cleaning

HOW DIESEL FUEL INJECTOR SERVICE WORKS

HOW DIESEL FUEL INJECTOR TESTING SERVICE WORKS?

➥ CONTACT TURBOVANES AND PROVIDE YOUR VEHICLE INFORMATION 

➥ WE WILL CONFIRM IF WE CAN TEST YOUR INJECTORS 

➥ IF WE CAN TEST YOUR INJECTORS THEN BRING YOUR INJECTORS TO US 

➥ WE WILL TEST YOUR INJECTORS WHILE YOU WAIT 

➥ YOU CAN ALSO SEND YOUR INJECTORS TO US VIA POST FOR TESTING 

➥ PRINTED TEST RESULTS WILL BE PROVIDED WITH THE INJECTOR 

IF ANY REPAIRS ARE NEEDED WE WILL CONTACT YOU FIRST 

 

Diesel Fuel Injector Problems Can Be Any or All of the Following

1-Cutting Out and Losing Power When Hot and Cold,

2-Giving you White black or blue smoke

3-Misfire or knocking /Tapping Noise

4-Hesitating when Revving up

5 - Knocking noise

 

Before Fitting Our Re-manufactured Diesel Fuel Injector:

  • Please Check For Fuel Contamination
  • Must Change Fuel Filter
  • Must Clean All 4 Cylinder Head Seats before Installing Our Injectors
  • Must Use New Injector Clamp to Cylinder Head Stretch Bolts

How to Diagnose, Test and Clean Dirty, Clogged or Bad Fuel Injectors

Fuel injectors could be very expensive and also a lot of times hard to get to which makes being able to accurately diagnose a dirty fuel injector very crucial.

The fuel injector in its test rig and connect up the oil supply. Under no circumstances should hands be placed under the injector spray. The high velocity oil jet can penetrate the skin and cause blood poisoning. With the injector priming valve open, operate the hand pump to prime the injector. Once the fuel flows from the priming valve it can be closed.

  1. Oil Container
  2. Pressure Gauge
  3. Shut off valve
  4. Pump lever
  5. Test pump
  6. Injector
  7. High Pressure fuel pump

Operate the pump rapidly for several strokes. The injector should open with a high pitched chatter and fuel should be emitted in a fine cloud. After the injector opens, check to make sure the pressure does not fall off too quickly.

Following points to be remembered while testing of fuel injector:

  1. Visually examine the injector just after taken from cylinder head. Pressure test and find opening pressure in service.
  2. Check injector setting pressure, formation of trumpets and carbon accumulation, corrosion at the nozzle, etc.
  3. Spray pattern assessment and prompt re-seating.
  4. Drip proof. No droplet formation at set pressure minus 10 bar, held steady and also upon closing.
  5. Injector lift diagram may be taken.
  6. Recommended assembly procedure to be followed (Like tightening torque, etc.) and handle parts carefully.

How to Test Fuel Injectors

The fuel injectors in your vehicle are designed to spray fuel into the cylinders of your engine where it is combined with air and compressed before being ignited by the spark plug to produce power.

The easiest way to locate the fuel injectors for your specific vehicle is to refer to the service manual for that vehicle. Most applications have one fuel injector for each cylinder. They are usually located on the intake manifold and are connected to one another with a fuel rail.

  • The fuel rail is a cylindrical rail that will run along the top of the intake manifold, and each fuel injector will be between the fuel rail and the intake manifold.
  • V style engines (V6, V8, V10) will have two fuel rails with half of the injectors on each side of the motor.

Find a long metal rod or screwdriver. Locate a thin piece of metal that’s at least a foot or so long. It should be made mostly of metal, but you could opt to use a screwdriver despite it having a plastic or rubber handle.

  • Make sure the piece you choose is at least a foot long, but not more than two feet.
  • A long screwdriver or thin piece of rebar will work fine.

Place the tip of the rod on a fuel injector. You will be using the metal rod to transmit sound from the fuel injector to your ear without having to bring your face too close to a running engine. Set one end of the rod or screwdriver on the injector itself while holding it up with one hand.

  • Make sure to hold the screwdriver or metal rod at an angle that will allow you to bring your ear to it.

Bring your ear close to the rod and listen for clicking. Lean your ear close to the end of the metal rod or screwdriver that is opposite the injector. As the engine runs, listen for an audible clicking sound given off by the injector. This sound indicates the injector being activated

  • Be extremely careful leaning your head into the engine bay, and ensure you keep your eyes open as you listen to the rod to prevent accidentally getting injured.
  • If you have long hair, tie it back tightly to prevent it from getting caught in any moving parts under the hood.

Repeat these steps for each injector. Use the same method to check each fuel injector in your vehicle. If you find one that is not clicking, there is an issue with the injector or the electronic control that is transmitting to the injector.

  • If you have an OBDII scanner and your vehicle’s check engine light is on, you can check to see if there have been any errors in the vehicle’s computer regarding that cylinder or injector.
  • Replacing this injector may solve the problem, but you may also need to have a diagnostic done of your vehicle’s electronic control unit and fuel system by a professional mechanic.

 

Ensuring the Injectors Are Receiving Power

Turn the key to the “on” position without starting the engine. To conduct this test, the vehicle's electrical system must be active without the engine actually running. Insert the key and turn it until the electrical system activates, but stop before you engage the engine's starter. This should activate all of the vehicle’s electronics like interior lighting and the radio.

  • If you accidentally start the vehicle, simply turn it off and try again.
  • The vehicle’s battery is powering everything during this test, so you should turn off things like the headlights and stereo to conserve power and ensure it has enough to start the vehicle again later.

Connect a test light to the negative terminal on the battery. A test light looks like a screwdriver with a finely pointed end and a wire hanging out of the handle. When the wire from the handle and the pointed end come into contact with a completed and powered circuit, a lightbulb lights up inside the handle of the test light. The wire extending from the handle will have an alligator clip at the end. Attach that alligator clip to the negative terminal of the vehicle’s battery.

  • You can identify the negative terminal on the battery by looking for the negative symbol (-) or the letters NEG.
  • Make sure the clip has a good metal on metal connection to make the test light work.

Locate the two wires going into each injector. Each fuel injector will have a metal clip plugged into it with two wires coming out of it. One of those two wires is a 12-volt constant that should be continuously receiving power from your vehicle’s electrical system. There should be a small portion of each wire exposed coming out of the plastic clip that connects to the injector.

  • These wires are often grey and black, but can come in any number of colors.
  • They will be the only wires coming from each injector.

Test each wire for voltage. Take the sharp end of the test light and press it firmly into the rubber coating around each wire until it penetrates into the metal wiring itself. One of the two wires should make the test light turn on when it comes into contact with the wire inside the protective coating. If the test light turns on with one wire, then the injector is receiving the necessary constant voltage.

    • Make sure to wrap a piece of electric tape around any holes in the wiring’s protective coating that are big enough to see.
    • If neither wire makes the light turn on, then there is an issue with the power reaching the fuel injector, which will result in in failing to fire.

Repeat the process for each injector. Test each wire coming out of the fuel injectors in your vehicle. If you locate one injector with a power issue, that doesn’t mean others may not have the same problem. Once you identify an injector with a power issue, make a note of which one it was and continue to test the rest.

  • Follow the wires on the injectors that fail to engage the test light to make sure there are no breaks in the wire that may prevent the electricity from reaching it.
  • Let your mechanic know that you were able to identify the injector with a power issue. It may require replacing the vehicle’s electronic control unit.

 

Checking the Trigger Circuit for the Injectors

Connect a test light to the positive terminal of the battery. Take the same test light that you used for the previous test, but this time connect the alligator clip to the positive terminal on the battery instead of the negative

 

  • You can identify the positive terminal by looking for the positive sign (+) on the battery or the letters POS.
  • Make sure the alligator clip has secure, metal on metal contact or the test light will fail to function.

Probe the opposite wire with the test light. Use the test light and check the opposite wire of the constants you identified in the previous test. Press the sharp end of the probe through the rubber coating firmly until it makes contact with the metal wire inside.

  • Be careful not to press the probe all the way through the wire and out the other side.
  • Always cover holes in the wire’s protective coating with electric tape once you’re done.

Look for flashing or flickering light. With the engine running at an idle, the test light should flicker dimly and as your helper applies throttle by pressing the gas pedal, the light should flicker more brightly. This light represents the signal being transmitted by the ECU to the injector to spray fuel. If the test light is failing to light up, the injector may be bad or there could be an issue with the electronic control unit for the vehicle.

  • This issue could be caused by a failing ECU, or one of the injectors along the fuel rail may be faulty.
  • The electrical pulse is transmitted through each of the injectors to one another, so one faulty injector could cause issues in multiple injectors.

Disconnect the wiring clips to each injector and begin the test again. With none of the injectors connected, the flickering pulse should transmit through all of the wires without any issue. Use the test light to confirm this on the wire for the last fuel injector clip (at the end of the fuel rail). Keep the test light connected as you reconnect each fuel injector one by one. As you connect each injector, the pulse intensity should remain the same. It shouldn’t change until you connect a faulty injector that creates too much resistance for the pulse to travel through easily.

  • When the pulsing light dims as you connect one of the injectors, that injector is faulty and needs to be replaced.
  • You can purchase new fuel injectors for your vehicle at most auto parts stores.


Fuel injector flow testing includes the following:

 Leak inspection: All injectors are meticulously inspected for leaks both on the injector body and at the output nozzle. An injector that is leaking from the nozzle usually requires a simple cleaning to operate properly.
 

  • Ohm testing: A simple test to verify the condition of the injector coil, we test the resistance (measured in Ohms) across the terminals of the injector connector.
  • Spray pattern verification: During the flow test, our techs evaluate the spray pattern of your injectors. If there are deposits on the nozzle the spray pattern can be adversely affected – this can be corrected by cleaning the injectors.
  • Pulse Operation: Our techs test your injectors at pulse widths ranging from idle to full-throttle operation. Any abnormalities will be noted and discussed with you.
  • Flow rate verification:  Even if the spray pattern isn’t affected by deposits, it is still possible for internal deposits and/or corrosion to cause variations in flow rate. If your injectors do not flow the correct amount OR match each other well, a cleaning will typically correct the imbalance.
  • Flow data sheet: You will receive a flow sheet which contains flow data from the test. See the example data sheet.
  • Seal replacement: We replace all standard injector seals - please make sure you include the injector seals with your injectors so that we can match the seals that fit your vehicle.
     

MAILING INSTRUCTIONS: Be sure to send in a completed service form in the package* with your externally clean, dry, carefully packed fuel injectors. The injectors should be packaged so that they can't move around and damage each other. Dusty or greasy injectors increase service times since they must be externally cleaned before testing - a little brake cleaner goes a long way! If you have a set of our injectors, our original box is an excellent way to get them back to us and fits perfectly into a USPS Priority Mail small flat rate box.    


How to Test a Dead Injector


One of the tests you can do on a dead injector is by checking the injector's coil. For this test, you'll need a multimeter and the resistance value for the coil inside the injector. You can look up the injector resistance value in the service manual for your particular vehicle make and model. If necessary, buy an inexpensive, aftermarket repair manual at your local auto parts store or online. And if you haven't used a multimeter before, check the next video for a quick review on how to operate a multimeter.

Checking the Injector Coil

  1. With the engine off, unplug the electrical connector of the injector you need to test.
  2. Set your digital multimeter to an appropriate value on the Ohms scale according to the resistance specifications for your particular fuel injector (usually, you need to set the multimeter to read at least up to 30 Ohms).
  3. Probe the injector electrical terminals—polarity doesn't matter.
  4. A resistance reading other than the specified in your service manual means you need to replace the injector. For example:
  • If your meter reads infinite resistance, it means the coil in the injector is opened.
  • If your reading is jumping all over the place, the coil is partially opened.
  • However, if you read zero resistance, the coil is shorted.

Checking the Injector Controlling Circuit

You can check for power and pulse signal as it comes from the computer on each dead injector using a test light, an inexpensive an efficient tool.

  1. First, hook the test-light clip to a bolt or bare metal bracket on the engine.
  2. Unplug the electrical connector from the fuel injector you want to test.
  3. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
  4. Touch the terminals (one at a time) of the harness connector with the test light. One of the terminals should make the test light glow, this is the injector power source coming from the computer. If the test light doesn't glow, you've found the problem. Check the power side of the circuit for a short, blown fuse, or bad connection along the circuit, including the computer.
  5. Now, plug back the harness connector to the fuel injector and hook the test light clip to the positive side of the battery.
  6. Have an assistant crank or start the engine.
  7. Back probe the opposite wire on the fuel injector connector (this is the pulse signal coming from the computer). If you can't back probe the wire, insert a pin through the wire and use the pin to probe the wire.

* If this is a dead injector and the power and the pulse signals are present, replace the injector.

The injector's performance is critical to the correct running of the computerized fuel injected engine. With a dirty injector like this one, problems can range anywhere from lack of power to poor fuel economy, hard starting to rough idling, even to poor derivability.

Turbo Vanes are a UK supplier of New and Reconditioned Fuel Injectors. We also offer new, repair & a reconditioning service for most Vehicle Fuel Injectors at very competitive prices for the public and the automotive trade sector.

Turbo Vanes is the pioneer of all types of new and refurbished turbo actuators. We are offering deposit old turbo actuator. Shop with Turbovanes
 


Please contact us via any of the following:
Phone: 
07977990613

Address: Turbo Vanes, Suite 115, 51 Pinfold Street, Birmingham, B2 4AY, UK